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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
until november 2014. >> senior congressional correspondent dana bash joins me now. dana, can we expect fire woworkt the meeting this morning? >> reporter: possibly, carol. one thing that has been interesting with regard to john boehner's leadership of the republican conference, which certainly is very conservative and he has had to balance that with negotiations with the white house on a number of occasions, one thing that's interesting is that until now he really has been able to maintain their loyalty. and their confidence that whatever he does, he he's doing for a reason because the alternative would be worse. and one thing that he did in a very deliberate way on this particular counter offer, which they sent to the white house earlier this week, was it wasn't just a letter from boehner to the president. it was a letter from the entire republican leadership, including paul ryan, including the budget chair. not just the budget chair but former vice presidential candidate who went across the country, campaigning and promising not to raise tackxes. he is trying to have his bases covere
is standing pat at the white house to figure out just exactly what the movements are every day. dana bash is on capitol hill. dan, let me start with you. we were just hearing from the president and we were cut off by a nasty satellite. let me talk about these business people and what exactly they can bring to the table because it seems as though he's soliciting them for advice. >> reporter: he is. but at the same time, you brought up a good point, that the president really has been doing a lot of the pressure as opposed to sitting down with lawmakers face-to-face. he's using outside groups to put pressure on lawmakers. so he's had middle class americans here at the white house. he's had small business owners and big-time ceos at the white house and now he's reaching out to the business roundtable. many movers and shakers in the business community to make the case as a white house official that if -- without this fiscal cliff situation being resolved, it doesn't give the certainty that not only businesses need to start making investments, to hiring more people, but also middle class americ
. joining me now, dana bash, jessica yellin, and david gergen. what's the latest? >> reporter: they are a long way from a deal. but late today speaker boehner and president obama did speak to one another on the phone. now, this is an important development because it's the first time they've talked in a week about the fiscal cliff. i am told, though, that there was no real progress in negotiations. in this sense there was no breakthrough on that central point of tax rates. as you know, president obama insists there is no deal unless the gop agrees to raise rates on the top 2% of earners. the gop says that's a nonstarter. and the two men have not moved from that basic position. now, all of this comes at the same time treasury secretary geithner also said for the first time the administration would be willing to go over the fiscal cliff if the gop does not agree to raise those rates. this was treasury secretary geithner earlier today on cnbc. >> is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve
with moody's chief economist mark zandy, jackie comes of the "new york times" and cnn's dana bash. i'm candy crowley and this is "state of the union." >>> politically the speaker is playing with a weaker hand that the president, the pressure is higher on him and his critics are harder too. >> the republican party's finished. >> he is selling out our children right now with these massive tax increases and that's a starting bid. he's saying here $800 billion now will you sit down with us, obama? >> twistill with the votes get counted in his caucus of republicans, boehner seems to have more room to maneuver than he did in preelection face-offs over political matters. even if the republican speaker gets a deal, can he get it passed? joining me now, republican congressman tom cole of oklahoma and marsha blackburn of tennessee, thank you both so much for joining us, that's really the key question, we keep saying they'll get a deal, they'll get something. it doesn't matter whether the two of them get a deal, it matter also the speaker haas the house votes to vote for it. how free a hand do you thin
. dana bash, capitol hill, following the negotiations. how many times have i said fiscal cliff over the past couple months, i can't even, if i had a nickel for every time i'd be a wealthy man. >> we'd be able to avert the fiscal cliff. >> exactly, very good, so much more clever and quicker than i am. dana good morning. the president and the house speaker offered new proposals. what do you know about them, if anything? >> reporter: you know, they're being very, very careful, they're holding their cards close to the vest, which i think you know as a reporter is frustrating but as somebody who certainly wants to get, to see this solved, that that is a completely nonpart son thing to say. it maybe is a good sign, because both sides are being very careful not to let the cat out of the bag on some of the specifics because they don't want the process to blow up even before it really starts in earnest. what we are told from democratic and republican sources is that it is still really just sort of the big picture that they're going back and forth on, big picture meaning how much are they goi
senior congressional correspondent dana bash has been working her sources throughout the morning, joining me live now from washington. one of the things i see, dana, that's so frustrating, is we get a lot of rhetoric on television and we hear later about secret conversations. i just wonder how much rhetoric is going on behind closed doors or if they're really getting closer. >> reporter: well, you just mentioned there was a monphone l between the speaker and the president, and by all accounts, it really did not go well. i'm learning new information about why that may have been. i talked to a democratic source that the counteroffer the house republicans sent back to the white house late yesterday included a call for a permanent extension of bush era tax cuts for the top 2%. you know we've been talking constantly about the fact that the biggest divide between the two when it comes to taxes is that tax break for the wealthiest. so this democratic source who i talked to familiar with the proposal said this was a sign to the white house that the republicans are either unwilling or not capable
on taxes and spending cuts? our senior congressional correspondent dana bash is up on capitol hill. what are you hearing, dana? >> reporter: the senate majority leader who told me he's one of the biggest pessimists says he thinks it's going to be very difficult to get a deal done by christmas. meanwhile, republicans don't have a lot of opposition to raising the tax rates tried a different tactic today. a new coordinated message from republicans searching for more secure political footing. mr. president, show us your cuts. >> where are the president's spending cuts? the longer the white house slow-walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. >> nobody should trust democrats to put a dime until real deficit reductions. >> reporter: to better understand the gop positioning, remember what any reduction deficit looks like drawn from two different pots of money. first, tax revenue. second, spending cuts likely to center on changes to entitlements like medicare. on revenues, republicans already conceded to tax increases for the wealthy. the big sticking point is what kin
dana bash is turning to more details now on what's apparently going wrong. what's the latest? >> reporter: a very interesting moment when the former democratic house speaker nancy pelosi had blunt advice for the current republican house speaker in terms of learning how to get his caucus together to find a deal that can actually pass congress and that the president will sign and those blunt words were, quote, figure it out. sources of both parties say a tuesday evening phone call between the president and speaker boehner did not go well. >> well, the president and i had a deliberate call yesterday and we spoke honestly and openly about the differences that we face. >> cnn has learned at least part of the reason why. tuesday's gop counteroffer included a renewed explicit call for a, quote, permanent extension of bush era tack cuts for the top 2% of americans. according to a democratic source familiar with the language. the democratic source argued that proposing to permanently extend tax cuts for the wealthy that the president calls a nonstarter shows that republicans are eithe
-- hold the phone for a minute here. dana bash from capitol hill is joining me. i heard your question. it was right on point. it was, i believe, question number one for the speaker. which was -- are you willing to start negotiating on the numbers of that top taxation issue between 35 and 39.5. you didn't get your answer. >> reporter: i didn't get my answer. but -- certainly other people were asking similar questions. i'm not sure if could you hear the questions from other reporters. finally, there was one question that asked about whether there is some middle ground on the republican position on the tax rates. the speaker speaker didn't say no. that was one of the most significant moments of this press conference. he didn't say no. his answer was basically that's -- you know, he's willing to talk about a lot of things if the president moves off his my way or the highway attitude. so that was -- again, that's pretty write significant. the other thing that, again, not sure if you could hear the question, somebody asked about the fact that timothy geithner, treasury secretary, said he's
is dana bash, senior correspondent. >> reporter: the house speaker ended the week with a progress report, none. >> when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> reporter: he and the president spoke by phone, only once all week, and it didn't produce much. >> just more of the same, it is time for the president to be serious, to come back to us with a counter offer. >> reporter: but what may have been most notable what was john boehner did not say. he did not repeat his demand to keep taxes cuts for the wealthy in place, the biggest issue that divides them, instead he said this. >> there are a lot of things possible for the revenue, to put on the table. but none of it will be possible if the president insists on his position, insists on my way, or the highway. >> reporter: aides to john boehner and the president who are doing the negotiating are tight-lipped. but others suggest possible compromise on the thorny tax issue. one, instead of raising the current tax rate on the wealthy from the 37% from the bu
the republicans will get the claim. we'll have more next, with dana bash, it -- unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management at the chevy year-end event because chevy's giving more. more efficiency with sonic and cruze... more function in equinox and traverse... more dependability with the legendary silverado... and more style in the all-new malibu. chevy's giving more at the year-end event because 'tis the season. chevy's giving more. this holiday season, get a 2013 cruze ls for around $169 per month or get $500 holiday bonus cash. >>> joining me around the table, dana bash, chief economist, mark zandi, and you have a new book out entitled "paying the price." steven moore, and jackie calmes. let's just ask you two, first, so set the stage. will it be armageddon? should we all start hoarding gold? you get such differing opinions about what would happen. >> well, january 1, no, no big deal. particularly if t
" in just a moment. first, let's get some background from our senior congressional correspondent dana bash joining us from capitol hill. i think it's fair to say, dana, all of us were stunned by this announcement today. >> reporter: that's right, wolf. well, senator demint had always said he was going to limit himself to two terms in the senate. but he's not even halfway through his second term and saying he's going to leave in january with almost four years left. i'm told he didn't tell his staff about his decision until this morning right before it was made public. but he said this was an offer to go to this conservative think tank he couldn't pass up. jim demint's announcement that he's leaving the senate was a stunner. >> i honestly believe i can do a lot more on the outside than i can on the inside. >> reporter: the anti-government, anti-tax conservative crusader certainly made a mark on the inside. on the senate floor, a frequent voice of objection against legislation backed by both parties. >> is there any objection? >> mr. president, i object. >> reporter: just this week he helped
no previous indication he might quit now. i want to go to dana bash joining me on the phone here. dana, huge surprise to a lot of people. what's behind the resignation. >> reporter: a huge stunner. nobody saw it coming. i was told by a source close to demint he didn't accept the job until yesterday telling the staff this morning, called the governor in south carolina who, of course, will have to appoint the successor and told the republican leaders here. but look. the reason why it's such a surprise is because demint really has been over the past few years somebody who takes pride in his job. and the role that any one senator can do, which is to gum up the works and very much, obviously, an inside job. he said he could be better outside than inside an he said he feels better about leaving because he has been able to get a number -- really, half a dozen tea party-like conservatives elected. >> let me jump in, dana. i want to run through them because, you know, when we think senator demint we think of a tea party stronghold within the u.s. senate and helped and also hurt a number of republican
. >> dana bash is our senior congressional correspondent. she s unearthed some surprising new details here about the speaker's latest offer to the president. dana, what can you tell us? >> reporter: well, we were told first earlier today by democratic source that part of the reason why that phone call between the president and the speaker didn't go so well to put it mildly is because part of the republican counteroffer they sent to the white house yesterday included a renewed call for, quote, permanent tax cuts for the wealthiest americans. now, we know that that is a nonstarter in general for the president. he said it ump team times, but the democrats at the white house felt that to put the word permanent in a republican offer made clear according to the source i talked to that it was -- that they just don't understand what needs to be done to get something to pass the senate and the house, or to get more importantly the president to sign something. that's one of the main reasons why there is a lot of tension today. i can tell you on the republican side, the speaker wasn't happy because h
's bring in our senior congressional correspondent dana basch, she has the latest. >> reporter: there's so much political theater around here right now, you could say tickets. one of today's acts was the house leaving. lawmakers streaming out of the capitol hill, racing to their cars to get to the airport and go home. it's a scene you usually see on a thursday afternoon or friday morning, not wednesday at noon. >> good morning. >> house republican leaders told members they're free to leave, because they have nothing to vote on. >> i understand that you are saying legislation has been put on the floor. when it comes to just pure optics of the house leaving with the fiscal cliff right in front of us -- >> i'll be here and i'll be available at any moment to sit down with the president to get serious about solving this problem. >> in fact, sending lawmakers home is a way for house republicans to illustrate their current message, your move, mr. president. >> we need a response from the white house, we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> john boehner made a point at expressing dismay the presiden
of the federal government since world war ii. dana priest and will yaj arkin have documented that the u.s. government has built 33 new building complexes for the intelligence bureaucracies alone, occupying 17 million square feet, the equivalent of 22 u.s. capitals or three pentagons. the department of homeland security itself employs almost one quarter of a million people. of course, there are new branches out there. those terrorists should be captured or killed, but we have done this before and we can do it again in the future under more normal legal circumstances. it will mean that the administration will have to be more careful and perhaps have more congressional involvement for certain actions like drone strikes. it might mean it will have to charge some of the people in guantanamo and try them in military or civilian courts. but is all this bad? so have we reached a point where we might consider shifting from emergency wartime powers? well, a new report is out this week, a new global terrorism index. it goes from 2002 to 2011. it shows that terrorism went up from '02 to '07 largely
's go to dana joining us from capitol hill. the latest negotiations don't seem to be going anywhere. >> they sure don't. the house speaker ended the week by calling it a wasted week. he only had one phone call with the president of the united states and he said it was just, "more of the same." now counter offer to what the republicans put out during the week which was $800 billion in new tax revenue. so there's certainly a lot of frustration. particularly right now on the side of republicans who understand that democrats have the leverage right now. but on friday, the speaker did do something that seemed to indicate a little bit of day light. and that is he declined to put a line in the sand on that big issue that divides the two parties, which is raising tax rates for the wealthiest americans. he was asked a number of times whether he's still sticking to that. he didn't say yes. instead, here's what he said. >> there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue the president seeks on the table. but none of it is going to be possible. the president insists on his positio
montgomery, thank you. i want to start there with dana bash here in a moment. because the fiscal cliff debate is starting to sound like, you know, a high stakes game of chicken. there is all kinds of tough talk. no action. right now democrats and republicans are refusing to compromise on this key sticking point, how to get more money from wealthy people. president obama, you know the deal, he wants to raise tax rates for the wealthy. house speaker john boehner wants to close tax loopholes, limit deductions for the wealthy. let's stay on the hill here, let's talk to senior congressional correspondent dana bash. we know the speaker -- we know speaker boehner met with conservative republicans today. did he get any backlash today from his plan? >> reporter: you know what, interestingly it doesn't seem like he did. we know that conservatives are not happy with the idea that their own house republican leadership proposed a plan that includes $800 billion in new revenue. we have seen -- reported on it extensively yesterday and the day before about the e-mail alerts that conservative groups have put
. >> that was kind of funny. that shows how long it has been, dana. i know you covering the hill, the white house for many years. you can't do that without really having a lot of conversation and time with joe bieberman. i remember covering the al gore/lieberman race when he lost in 2000 or so. what do you think he's going to be known for? what is going to stand out, his mark on his 24 years? >> reporter: i think there's no question his mark is how unconventional he has been and particularly the way he has straddled both parties. he's now officially independent, as you mentioned. he was a democrat, a life-long democrat so much so he was chosen by al gore to be the democratic party's vice presidential candidate, running mate, and then just six years later in 2006 he was tossed out by democratic voters in the state of connecticut in the primary there because of his unwavering support for the iraq war. then he became an independent, and then two years after that in 2008 i was on the campaign trail with the republican presidential candidate, john mccain, and joe lieberman was there almost every day a
. dana bash on the hill. a standoff here, republicans essentially saying, look, the president is not being reasonable here, and then you have the white house saying this is magic beans and fairy dust. is this a lot of posturing here? are we really at an impasse? >> yes to both of those questions. there is a lot of post urg, but we do seem to be at an impasse. i want to show our viewers some video that will illustrate just what we're talking about. that is pictures of members of the house of representatives leaving for the week, and now, i don't want tower viewers to get concerned. the calendars on the desk tops are not wrong. it is still wednesday. this did happen at noon on wednesday. it would be nice if all of us could do that, but -- >> yeah, really. >> this is not an accident. republican leaders say that they just simply have nothing to vote on right now on the floor of the house, and, you know, it helps them illustrate the whole message that they're sending out, which is that the ball is in the president's court. it is up to him to respond to the republicans at this point
. leading member of the tea party. he'll take over the head of the heritage foundation. cnn's dana bash live on capitol hill with more. why did senator demint decide to step down? >> we're trying to get more information from his aides. maybe find him in the hallways here. it's a bit of a surprise because demint has felt that he's been able to be effective here in congress because he has been kind of a conservative very willing to push his own leadership in ways that often times they don't want to be pushed with regard to deficit reduction, with regard to strict fiscal policy. that's by far his number one issue. i can tell you he's also really angered republican leaders over the past two election cycles by raising millions of dollars, a lot of money, for republican candidates who "establishment" thought were less able to win the general election. he is a purist. he's an anti-tax, anti-government purist. it does seem that he's kind of had it here. he wouldn't be the only one to say that they don't feel they can get enough done from the inside and it's probably better to go to the house. we'll
potentially be very significant. let's bring in our senior congressional correspondent, dana bash. >> reporter: reckless was the strong word the speaker used to describe timothy geithner's statement that he is willing to go over the cliff if republicans don't give on tax rates for the wealthy. i am told by a congressional source familiar with the talks they only had four, four staff level negotiations on the issue of the fiscal cliff, and that's why the speaker says the president is slow walking the issue. the house speaker ended the week with a progress report. none. >> when it comes to the fiscal cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> reporter: he and the president spoke by phone only once all week and it didn't produce much. >> just more of the same. it is time for the president if he's serious to come back with a counteroffer. >> reporter: what may have been most notable was what boehner did not say. he did not repeat his demand to keep tax cuts for the wealthy in place, the biggest issue that divides them. instead, when asked
on this one. >> dana milbank said republicans had not merely thrown up the white flag, but the white bed sheet. i think you have seen movement on the part of republicans, that they're willing to give the government $800 billion of revenue and the president hasn't been willing to meet that because of his fetish about raising tax rates on the top 2%. but as for negotiations, i rather like jeff sessions, the senator's suggestion that these are really big issues and very big decisions that should be made by our elected representatives in the senate and in the house. i'm not sure i like this idea that the president and the house majority leader, a republican, get to meet behind closed doors and get to make enormous fiscal decisions just between the two of them. >> do you think more would get done if they did this in front of the cameras? >> i actually think it should be one extreme or the other. they should either lock them behind closed doors until they get something done, let them hash it out, and then come out and announce the deal that we're not going to go over the fiscal cliff, or put everyth
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)